Valve End Connection Types

There are numerous types of end connections used for installing valves and other components into piping systems.

While all terminal connections perform the same general functions — helping valves perform their basic functions, keeping high pressure contained and maintaining workplace safety — choosing the wrong valve connection types can affect your productivity and, more importantly, put your team in danger.

It’s noteworthy to know which connection types best fit your application to maximize efficiency and safety in oilfield upstream and downstream operations. Finding the best fit(s) can be based on several factors, including:

To help you narrow down your search, we’ve put together a quick overview of the most common types of valve end connections.

Threaded

Threaded valve end connections are very common in low-pressure piping systems because these are quick and easy to assemble. They form tight and streamlined connections between valves and pipes.

Examples of Threaded Valves
Ball Valves and Gate Valves have threads that can be screwed and unscrewed.

Straight threads use a soft seal like an o-ring or washer that’s compressed between the valve and pipe, hose, or other fittings. Tapered threads provide a similarly powerful connection without using a soft seal.

While threaded connections can be welded around the joint upon assembly, this isn’t done often, as it can hamper the valves’ efficiency and attachments.

Flanged

One of the most commonly used connector types, flanged valve end connections, can be easily installed or uninstalled, making them an ideal choice when parts of a valve need to be swapped out regularly.

Not only can they be used on various types of valves, but flanged connections are secured with multiple bolts, which require far less tightening torque than threaded end connections. 

Socket Weld

If you need something more solid than a threaded or flanged valve end connection, a socket weld connection is a great option. Socket weld connections provide long-term, leak-proof connections for pipelines that handle higher temperatures and pressures and don’t need to be disassembled regularly.

These connections are used on valves made of steel and feature a socket with an inner diameter slightly larger than the pipe’s outer diameter. Once the pipe is inserted into the socket, it can easily be welded around the rim.

Butt Weld

Butt weld valve end connections share many of the same characteristics as socket weld connections: They’re used on steel valves, are very durable, and provide secure connections for pipelines that handle high pressures and temperatures.

However, these connections don’t feature a socket as they are instead designed so that each end of the valve is beveled to match the thickness and bevel on the pipe. After the two ends are butted to the pipeline, they are welded.

 

Valve Types Based on Directions of Motion

Valve Type

Linear Motion

Rotary Motion

Quarter Motion

GATE

YES

NO

NO

GLOBE

YES

NO

NO

PLUG

NO

YES

YES

BALL

NO

YES

YES

BUTTERFLY

NO

YES

YES

SWING CHECK

NO

YES

NO

DIAPHRAGM

YES

NO

NO

PINCH

YES

NO

NO

SAFETY

YES

NO

NO

RELIEF

YES

NO

NO